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AP Microeconomics

Welcome to AP Microeconomics! To view daily agenda items and access links, please select from the appropriate unit on the left. In order to download the links, you need to be logged in to a jeffcoschools.us Google account.

Classroom login for ECONlowdown (www.econlowdown.org/student): JAKyNxt

AP MICROECONOMICS SYLLABUS
Economics is both a practical and an academic discipline.  Although economics involves the formulation of theory, it is not a purely theoretical subject; economic theories can be applied to real-world examples.  Neither is economics a discrete subject, since economics incorporates elements of history, geography, psychology, sociology, political studies, and many related fields of study. 
Economics presents new learning with a specific set of terms and concepts to be addressed.  Developing “an economic way of thinking” is vital to understanding economics coursework.

            The AP Economics Course Description 2012 states, “The purpose of an AP course in microeconomics is to give students a thorough understanding of the principles of economics that apply to the functions of individual decision makers, both consumers and producers, within the economic system. It places primary emphasis on the nature and functions of product markets and includes the study of factor markets and of the role of government in promoting greater efficiency and equity in the economy.” This course will give you a thorough understanding of the principles of microeconomics, taking a look at the role of the “players” in the economy.  The focus will be basic concepts, nature and functions of product markets, factor markets, market failure and the role of government.

Textbook

Lakewood High School will provide a copy of Krugman’s Economics for AP by Margaret Ray and David Anderson. If you lose or destroy your copy, you should replace it by utilizing the online second-hand market by May 1.

 

Additional handouts and readings will also be provided by the teacher.

 

If you are interested in purchasing an AP Test review book, I recommend Eric Dodge’s Five Steps to a Five.  Two other options are Barrons AP Macroeconomics and Microeconomics or Princeton Review: Cracking the AP Micro and Macroeconomics. This is entirely up to you; I intend to prepare you for the exam without requiring additional expense.

 

Assessment

Grades are earned, not given.  Points are earned for quizzes, projects, tests, class-work, and homework.  Grades are cumulative on a semester basis and are calculated on a standard 10-percent scale using weighted categories. There will be 5 (100 points) unit tests and 8 (10-25 points) quizzes, worth 50% of the overall grade.  Within each unit, Free Response Questions and Multiple Choice Questions will be used for reinforcement and practice. Students will be informally assessed with other instruments of assessment such as homework assignments, on-line assignments, and group work in the classroom. This category is worth 20% of the overall grade.  The final exam will be a past AP test and will serve as 30% of the semester grade.

 

It is expected that all students will take the AP Microeconomics exam scheduled in May.

 

Late Work

It is the students’ responsibility to ask for any notes or assignments related to tardiness or absences during office hours.  I will post lecture notes and other handouts on the class website.  Flexibility regarding this policy will be allowed for students who communicate exceptional circumstances directly to the teacher.  Graded problems and worksheets may be submitted at any time until the unit exam for full credit. No assignment will be accepted after that material is tested.

 

Office Hours

3:10 pm – 3:50 pm

Planning periods blocks 4, 5, and 8.

Please make an appointment ahead of time for meetings during planning period(s) as I have many duties at LHS. 

 

General Expectations

I will instruct this class in a method that best exemplifies an introductory level college course, and I expect students to act accordingly. Due to the short nature of the course and the vast amount of material involved, students are expected to become learners both IN and OUT of the classroom. This means doing reading when it is required and becoming aware of current events and political happenings. It is expected that students stay informed about current events; it would be ideal to read a newspaper every day as well as a weekly magazine such as Business Week. Only in this fashion can students begin to truly understand and apply knowledge. True learning does not occur in the vacuum of the classroom.

 

If you are having problems understanding course material, you should meet with me. I am happy to talk through the material or suggest videos by teachers who flip their classrooms.

 

I do not expect student behavior to be a problem.  Students will respect themselves, their classmates, their teacher (including substitutes), and any adult joining us during class at all times.  Students will be held accountable to the Code of Conduct for Lakewood High School students.  Students will arrive on time and be ready to participate each and every day. 

 

Cell phones MUST be out of sight (not seen or heard) unless the teacher directly suggests use.  Violation of this policy WILL result in confiscation!

 

My website will contain each PowerPoint and handout. Locate it via the LHS Tiger page. You must be logged in to your Jeffco Google account in order to access the calendar with attachments.

 

 

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