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AP Language & Composition Spring

Date

In Class

 
Homework 

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   REGISTER FOR THE AP EXAM HERE!
 
     
     
     
 2.19  Jeffco Writing Challenge DUE for submission
Introduce Research Paper
 
 2.14  Tomorrow is end of 1st 6 weeks.
Jeffco Writing Challenge--timed paper
 Revise Jeffco Writing Challenge paper for submission next time. This should be typed--be sure to proofread and edit.
 2.12    
 2.8    
 2.6  Timed Argument
Samples
Score and rationale
 
 2.4  Timed Argument
Samples
Score and rationale
 
 1.31 UNDER CONSTRUCTION:

 Writing Practice:
Who makes a better leader? Someone who is loved or someone who is feared?

 1.29  WP: Using the articles you read for homework and the sample prompt on the board, write your own argument prompt. This may be about the current event/issue you are working on for homework or may be anything else. Be sure to use the AP language for your prompt. THEN, write a position statement that makes an argument and addresses/answers the prompt. Discuss your prompts and articles in groups.

Argument Practice:

Group poster board paper for argument prompt (with a HARD prompt) (30 min.)

Look at the sample papers that go with this prompt. (30 min)
 Under Construction
 1.25 Finish discussing p. 111-130 (BEFORE the 10 minute writing)
Share valid syllogisms
Re-read "The Declaration of Sentiments" and discuss the journal questions/answers.
Briefly discuss Toulmin method of argumentation.

10 minutes writing:
Take a position on: Social Media is toxic to self-esteem.
15 minute TED Talk "Is Social Media Hurting Your Mental Health?"
Debate the impact (negative or positive) of social media.
Revise your position statement from the 10 minute writing.

Work on homework or read additional arguments with remaining time.
Finish homework from last time! This is due next time. I will check your journals next time. 
 1.23 Editorials and arguments
Read the NTY student editorials from 2016. (See me for a copy of this if you were absent.)
Together read and annotate "Gym Class Villains."
Mark the claim (position), counterclaim (opposition/counterargument), evidence, and note the line of reasoning. Discuss.
Now, do this on your own for the 2nd article.

Then using the following prompt: "Does your school give too manly A's?" write a position statement for YES and one specific example to support this. Then, Write a position statement for NO and one specific example to support this. Finally, write a conditional/qualifying position statement .
Share and discuss.

Discuss LC pages 111-130
Structure of an argument
Re-read "Not By Math Alone" and discuss the organization ("classical"). What is the thesis? (Note the position it takes.) Note claims of policy, fact, and value. Note use of ethos and pathos.
Inductive reasoning--specific to general (most of your timed arguments will be inductive--they will be "strong" or "weak," not "right" or "wrong."
Deductive reasoning--syllogisms (p. 119) and Venn diagrams; difference between validity and truth. Practice this. 

Read  "The Declaration of Sentiments" aloud and discussion journal questions and answers.

Brief discussion of Toulmin model and assumptions. p. 128-129--work on assumptions in class.

Begin working on homework. You may use your own chromebook/laptop, phone, or a computer in the classroom (you will have to share) to start finding articles for the homework. You may want to cut and paste or print when you find them as many of the online news sources will let you read a limited number of articles before they begin to charge for access.  I have built in a weekend for this assignment, so you have time to read current article. The Denver Post chooses an issue on Sundays and includes a Pro and a Con editorial, or try out some of these sites to start:
AllSides Balanced News (this presents current issues from the left, center, and right)
NYT Editorials
Denver Post editorials
TYPED ASSIGNMENT FOR SUBMISSION! Please print and submit the articles with your answers.
Select 2 pieces on the same political, educational, or social issue--each piece must take a different position on the issue.  Print these to put in your journals.  Read AND annotate the pieces you have selected.  

For EACH text, answer the following questions. Be prepared to explain "WHY?" for everything you answer. You will have 1-2 pages of writing for EACH piece if you have thoroughly examined and analyzed the pieces you have selected.
  1. What is the argument's "claim (s)"? 
  2. What assumptions are made about the audience or as part of the argument itself?
  3. How does the author address the opposition? What is the effect of this method?
  4. What types of evidence does the author include?
  5. Does the author rely on ethos, logos, pathos, or a combination of both? 
  6. Are there important things that the author seems to ignore?
  7. How does the author use language, tone, and/or style to convey her/his message?
  8. Is this argument effective?  Why or why not?
  9. What effective argumentative techniques or strategies could you try in your own writing?

 I have built in a weekend for this assignment, so you have time to read current article. The Denver Post chooses an issue on Sundays and includes a Pro and a Con editorial, or try out some of these sites to start:
AllSides Balanced News (this presents current issues from the left, center, and right)
NYT Editorials
Denver Post editorials

Bring this with you to class next time in case we have time to work on it.

 1.18 10 minutes--writing practice. Examine the photo  from Jan 14, 2018 (if you have already looked at this for another class, then use the picture from Feb. 5, 2018).  Spend 10 minutes writing about what you literally see in this photo and what might be "going on"--who are the people? What is the story/the back story? What is happening?  Then scroll down to find the actual answers.
NYT What's Going on in this Picture?
--analyzing visuals, argue a claim
--discuss

 Discuss LC reading, logical fallacies, and logical fallacies assignment.
Review and discuss logical fallacies--it is important that you can recognize them even if you can't attach a label to them.
Examples: Faulty Logic
Activity:  What is wrong with THIS argument?
Jon Stewart fallacy video

Start reading the rest of Ch 3:
first and second hand evidence
discuss structure of an argument

 Read LC pages 111-130 AND complete the following activities in your journal (Journal 2):
--read pages 111-130 for general understanding; we will further discuss induction, deduction, and the various formal forms of argumentative writing next timer .
--Write an example of a VALID and TRUE syllogism.
--AFTER reading "The Declaration of Sentiments" answer the following:
1.  What is the argument's "claim (s)"?
2.  What assumptions are made about the audience?
3.  What types of evidence does the author include?
4.  Does the author rely on ethos, logos, pathos, or a combination of them?
5.  How does the author use language, tone, and/or style to convey his message?
6.  What is the effect of emulating "The Declaration of Independence"?
7.  Is this argument effective?  Why or why not?


1.16   1st 10 minutes--writing practice & quiz over primary claim, secondary claims, and counterarguments. Claim of fact, value, policy. Polite Speech prompt, scoring guidelines, and sample papers. Show prompt, guidelines and read 3 sample papers.
Generic argument scoring guidelines/rubric--KEEP THIS ALL YEAR.

LC Chapter 3--81-97
--discuss the Amy Domini argument and the questions in the activity box on p. 85.
--claim/assertion:  primary claim = thesis statement; secondary claims (discussed in support of primary claim) = topic sentences; discuss statements in activity box on p. 86
--types of claims: claims of fact (facts become arguable when they are questions, when they raise controversy, when they challenge people's beliefs); claims of value (to develop this argument, you must establish/define specific criteria or standards and then show to what extent the subject meets your criteria); claims of policy (proposes a change; defines problem, explains why it is a problem, offers a solution to the problem)
--review open and closed thesis statements
--discuss "counterargument" thesis statements ("although . . ., ", "while this . . .that)--these are often conditional as well.
--discuss and share thesis statements for activity p. 96-97
  

Work on LC Chapter 3--begin reading and working on the assignments.  DUE NEXT TIME (Jan 11).  You have the rest of the period to work on this (about 30 minutes)

LC Chapter 3 reading
Presenting evidence: pages 97-111 and complete Journal #1:

--Take notes on general and specific types of logical fallacies 
--Take notes on types of evidence and provide examples.-TRY the 1st activity on p. 109 ("identify the logical fallacy); choose 2 of the examples and explain in detail why they are not effective
 1.14 Need LC today and EVERY DAY for the rest of the semester unless I tell you otherwise.

Submit the test, your answers, and the  MC rationales today.

Timed argument essay for diagnostics. (40 minutes)

What is an argument? (youtube: Argument Clinic: Monty Python)
Argument: persuasive discourse (
written or spoken communication or debate), a coherent and considered movement from a claim to a conclusion (we call this "line of reasoning"). The goal of argument is not to win, but to better understand others ideas and your own. You must consider others' opinions (counter-argument) and make concessions or refutations, while including example and explanation to support your own ideas, viewpoint, position.

Work on Chapter 3 reading and assignments.

Read pages 81-97 and annotate or take notes; be prepared to take a quiz over the key ideas next time.

 Work on Chapter 3 reading and assignments.
Read pages 81-97 and annotate or take notes; be prepared to take a quiz over the key ideas next time.

 1/10 Timed multiple choice packet. (60 minutes); then guess on what you don't finish. (Course description 14)
Don't write on the test.

Answer key and check your own answers (released exam!)

Rationales assignment--due next time. January 14th.
6 rationales = C
8 rationales = B
10 rationales = A 

You will need to take the test home to complete this, but DON'T write on the test AND you must return the test when you submit your rationales. 
MC rationale assignment--due Monday, January 14, 2019
Even though you have been given the correct answers, this is actually a time consuming task and more difficult than you think. Select questions that you struggled with and do the following for EACH.
 

Write the question stem (the ENTIRE question without the answers)
Explain WHICH answer is correct and WHY it is correct
Explain WHY EACH of the incorrect answers is incorrect (you may have to examine relationships, look up words, etc.)

SAMPLE:

Multiple Choice Sample Rationale

Question 2:  Which of the following best represent the author's intended audience?
A--YES. The audience would be well acquainted with Carlyle's writing. This is obvious in lines 47 and 55 when his works are listed but not summarized (nor are examples from the works included). It is assumed that the audience is familiar with these works and will agree with the the effects that the author is describing.
B--No. No examples are given or analyzed. No summary of the prose is provided.
C--No. This passage is about the effects of Carlyle's prose, there is no discussion of HOW to write like Carlyle or discussion of other authors in general.
D--No. Methods for teaching Carlyle are not addressed.
E--No, it is about the influence of his writing. There are not examples from his personal life.

How many do I get to do!?
You MUST complete this correctly for 6 questions to earn a C on the assignment (21/30 points)
You MUST complete the correctly for 8 questions to earn a B on the assignment (24/30 points)
You MUST complete this correctly for 10 questions to earn an A on the assignment (30/30 points)
 
 Jan 9 WELCOME BACK and WELCOME TO 2019!
Image result for fireworks

35 minutes classes
Hand back and discuss visual analysis assignment from last semester.

Review syllabus and discuss the curriculum for 2nd semester. 
Preview next class period (you will have a substitute teacher--sorry)

Names (please notice your new neighbors) and something you read over break or the most exciting thing you did over break.
You will need paper and pencils next time.
   EVERYTHING listed below if from LAST YEAR and is for PLANNING PURPOSES ONLY. Do NOT do the assignments listed!  
     
  Link to AP TESTING SCHEDULE (This does not include late exam dates; please see Mrs. Gonzales in the main office for that information.)
 
 May 24 Finals periods 7 & 8
Block 7   8:00-9:30
Block 8   9:40-11:10
 
 May 23 Finals periods 4-6
Block 4   8:00-9:30

Block 5   9:40-11:10
Block 6   11:20-12:50

First 30 minutes to video PSA if not complete; complete evaluation form for course
Share AP PSA

 
 May 22 Finals periods 1-3
Block 1   8:00-9:30
Block 2   9;40-11:10
Block 3   11:20-12:50

Beginning of class: video PSA if not complete; complete evaluation form for course
Share AP PSA and fill out voter form.

 
 May 18 Video your PSA
--you may just video on your phone, then share it with me via email:
jennifer.webb@jeffco.k12.co.us OR jlwebb@jeffcoschools.us
OR 

AP Exams
AM--Human Geography, Microeconomics
PM--European History
 
 May 17 Black Day (No AP Lang)

AP Exams
AM--Comparative Govt and Politics, World History
PM--Statistics

 
 May 16  AM--AP Lang Test

PM--AP English class :)

Public Service Announcements
How to Write a PSA
Tips for Creating Your Own PSA

ASSIGNMENT (FINAL):
Write and video your AP PSA (45-60)
You should plan to complete this in pairs or groups of 3 (another person may video or you may work on your own if you prefer).
Your PSA should address the following: What do next year's students need to know about the AP Lang & Comp. course or test?
Here is your chance to (appropriately, of course) warn/enlighten/entertain them. ---Please read the content at the above links for information about content, purpose, etc. 
--PSA must be 45-60 seconds in length (THIS IS SHORT!)
--We will VOTE on finals day; the top 3 will be shared with Mrs. Webb's AP Lang. kids next year.
--We will work on these in class today, Friday (plan to video Friday if you are not taking the Euro test). If you are taking the Euro test, then either video on your own or we will have some time at the beginning of class finals day (you will have to remain in the room and do this quietly if you select this option.)


AP Exams
PM--Macroeconomics

 
 May 15 Black Day (No AP Lang)

AP Exmas
AP--Calculus AB, Calculus BC
PM--French Language and Culture, Computer Science A
 
 May 14  AP Review

Practice prompt selection review groups

AM--Biology, Music THeory
PM--Physics C
 
 May 11 Black (No AP Lang)

AP Exams:
 AM--APUSH
PM--Computer Science Principles
 
 May 10  AP Review--finish MC discussion 
Synthesis discussion

Practice prompt selection due

AP Exams:
AM--US Gov/Politics
PM--Environmental Science
 
 May 9 Black Day (NO AP Lang)

AP Exams
PM--Physics 2
 
 May 8  AP Review

MC

AP Exams:
AM--Spanish Language and Culture
PM--Art History, Physics 1
 Practice prompt selection
May 7 Black Day (No AP Eng)

AP Exams
AM--Spanish Language and Culture, Chemistry
PM--Psychology

Practice prompt selection
 May 4 Rhet Analysis and Argument Mock Reading Practice prompt selection
 May 2 More Writing--It is imperative that you are in class today!
--2 essays today!!! STUDENT ID NUMBERS
--Timed argument and rhetorical analysis





Practice prompt selection

Return LC Books by the end of the week! The following people owe me books:
Makayla
Emma
Sorbari
Ryan K
Julia
Jake
Anastasia
Miles
Pierce
Khyla
Micheal
Hali
 Apr. 30  Synthesis
--timed synthesis paper (this is the LAST one!)
 Practice prompt selection

Return LC Books by the end of the week! The following people owe me books:
Makayla
Emma
Sorbari
Ryan K
Julia
Jake
Anastasia
Miles
Pierce
Khyla
Micheal
Hali
 Apr. 24  Research paper rewrites due

Synthesis and MC
--samples and scoring
--practice
 READ essays from LC that you find interesting. You ONLY need your books for REVIEW at this point. IF you borrowed a book from me, you may return them starting NEXT CLASS.  
 Apr. 20
Revisit timed synthesis paper
--read
--samples
--scoring
--what grade do you THINK you earned and WHY?

More synthesis prompts and samples.
Practice prompt selection
Apr. 18  Synthesis
--Timed synthesis paper (15 minutes to read; 40 to write)
(local)

 Research paper rewrite/revisions
 Apr. 16 Submit rationales for MC test questions/answers--do we need to revisit and discuss any of them?

Synthesis
--Hand back and discuss your research/synthesis papers (both mandatory and optional rewrites due on April 24)

Working with sources practice (post office) activity in groups (45 minutes)
--Read prompt, write a working thesis, read sources and make marks/notations, which sources can you use and why?, which would you ignore and why?, which can you use "in conversation" with others?

Finish film IF there is remaining time at the end of the period.
 Work on mandatory research paper rewrites.

 Apr. 12 Reduced Shakespeare Company film--this will take the entire period; you will not quite finish the movie, but pay particular attention to R&J, Othello, etc.
IF I cannot find this film, you will watch The Taming of the Shrew.






 Apr. 6 Synthesis and Research paper DUE

Multiple Choice practice/team competition
--if you missed class, you cannot make this up as the materials we used cannot be taken out of the classroom due to copyright and security reasons.

Please see me ASAP (as in first thing MONDAY morning) to get the homework if you were not in class. You cannot find it online.

 Homework:

Multiple Choice test--time yourself--you have one hour.

Complete and bring to class on April 12.
Apr. 4  Finish SAT boot camp
--what do you need to know?

Synthesis and Research paper

--Work shop in groups of three
(I will have computers today in class if possible.)

--work on revisions

--final copies due next time--please submit a hard copy to me (as I will be reading them next week when I am not proctoring tests)
--headings and page numbers, etc.
 Paper

Final copy of researched argument due next time.
 Apr. 2 SAT mini boot camp:
punctuation review--commas and semi colons
weather/whether
effect/affect
fewer/less
number/amount
who/whom

 Synthesis and Research Paper

Bibliography DUE today--if it is not correct, you will redo it until it is.

Synthesis scoring rubric--read and dicuss

Work on paper/researched argument assignment. (3-4 pages, typed, double spaced) Incorporating sources into the rough draft of your argument. Don't forget to use sources "in conversation.
Paper should be no longer than 4 pages, typed double spaced.
Papers MUST use a minimum of 4 sources--3 to support your argument and 1 related to a counterclaim/counter argument.
 Work on paper.
   SPRING BREAK  
 3.22 Chapter 4 of LC--work on some of this in class.

Research assignment--supporting your argument with sources/refuting sources
--minimum 4  ACADEMIC sources when you return from break
Read, annotate, take notes, etc. on your sources; write a bibliographic entry for all 4 sources.

--I have a Chromebook cart checked out, but you may brig your own Chromebook or laptop as you wish.

 Finish finding minimum sources if you did not in class (3 to agree, 1 to disagree)

Print, read, annotate, take notes, etc. on your sources; write a bibliographic entry for all 4 sources.

Optional:
Work on revision of your argument to add the sources. You do NOT have to complete this during break.
 3.20 Timed essay from homework--discuss and look at sample papers.
Look at sample papers from another prompt if there is time.

Write on a timed prompt in class today!
Bring your library card to class next time (or number if you have it memorized!) We will be using Chromebook. If you'd rather bring your own laptop, that is fine. 

Chapter 4 of LC--
Read pages: 
 3.16 HAND BACK ESSAYS FROM OTHELLO!  REVIEW ARGUMENT!

Hand back all of the work you have submitted that I have been hoarding!

Discuss journal assignments:
--your own "proposal"/social issue
--other J. Swift pieces or Twain pieces (share and share rhet. analysis)
+
Read satire from Ben Franklin (LC book--"The Speech of Miss Polly Baker" (do last and in groups answer question:
 and Joseph Addision


Practice timed argument essay for homework. (This is 40 minutes timed; this is ALL of your homework.)

 Practice times argument essay for homework! 
Set a timer for 40 minutes and write.  This is due when you walk in the door next time (3.14)
You will also have another timed essay in class this day. Use tonight's to practice the timing, the thesis statement, and USING SPECIFIC EXAMPLES.
Honesty clause--this will NOT be scored; it is for your practice so you will do better on the one that IS scored. This one is more difficult than the in-class piece on 3.16.
 3.14 HAND BACK AND DISCUSS ESSAYS FROM OTHELLO

"A Modest Proposal"--graded class discussion.
 "Thanksgiving" Cartoons (15  minutes)

Swift--Who is his audience? What is his REAL purpose? What is his REAL proposal? (10 minutes)

Swift piece--jigsaw activity (Absent students will have to complete all sections of the worksheet:  A Modest Proposal: Elements of Satire)
(15 minutes in original groups; 30 minutes in second group)

Last 20 minutes--In your journal, begin your own proposal. What political or social issue do you see worthy of consideration, ridicule, and change? Write about this in your journal.



 You need your books next time!!!!!

Homework: Did Swift write anything that was not satire? What about Mark Twain (much of what you have read by him is satire).
Find a piece by EITHER Swift or Twain that is NOT Satire, read it, and complete a SOAPStone on it for rhetorical analysis review.
 3.12 Argument and satire
The Onion Magnasoles--Discuss the prompt and packet; show sample essay on this prompt.

Video:  Saving the children of the rich and famoushttp://www.theonion.com/video/celebs-rally-for-good-cause-with-save-our-children,34476
Examine written satire (whatever we do not get to today, we will use on Wednesday)

Stevenson "Cat Bill Veto" (did we read this 1st semester?)
Ian Frazier's "Laws Concerning Food and Drink"
--Read and discuss
--Write a rhetorical analysis question for one passage
--Write an argument question for the other passage

Work on the homework. Swift due 3.14.
 Homework Due 3.14

Read Jonathon Swift’s “A Modest Proposal” (LC p. 404-412); you may have to read this 2x for understanding.  Please write a one sentence summary in the margins of your text or in your notes after every 3-4 paragraphs; annotate the rest of the piece as you read.  Annotations should focus on methods of argumentation, development of satire, rhetorical devices/techniques, and persuasive appeals.

After reading, you should answer Questions for Discussion #1, 4, 5 and 6; type for submission
Be prepared to discuss Questions on Rhetoric and Style 1-12 as part of a graded class discussion.


 3.8 Onion Magnasoles packet--work on in pairs and/or groups of 3--NO groups larger than 3.  Submit with ALL names once completed.

Begin working on homework:  It is a very lengthy assignment. The assignment is due 3.14.
 Homework Due 3.14

Read Jonathon Swift’s “A Modest Proposal” (LC p. 404-412); you may have to read this 2x for understanding.  Please write a one sentence summary in the margins of your text or in your notes after every 3-4 paragraphs; annotate the rest of the piece as you read.  Annotations should focus on methods of argumentation, development of satire, rhetorical devices/techniques, and persuasive appeals.

After reading, you should answer Questions for Discussion #1, 4, 5 and 6; please type for submission.
Be prepared to discuss Questions on Rhetoric and Style 1-12 as part of an in-class graded discussion.
3.6 YOU NEED YOUR BOOKS ON THURSDAY! (And MondayArgument and satire
Share visual satires in groups of 4-5. Select the most effective to share with class. Submit ALL visual satires AND written responses to the questions.

TED - Comedy is Translation (15) This is an argument about the effectiveness of comedy

Begin examining written satire:


No homework :)

 March 2  Argument and Satire

Define satire

Types of Satire--notes
Look at examples of visual satire (political cartoon, comic strips, other visual satire) and answer the following:

  • What is being satirized?
  • What satiric devices are used in the satire?
  • Is this Horatian or Juvenalian satire?  How do you know?
  • What is the creator's purpose in composing this satire? (Keep the audience in mind as you answer this.)
  • Is this satire effective?  Why or why not?

Start working on homework.




Due next time:
Create your own cartoon or comic strip or some other form of visual satire. You must be able to share it in small groups or with the class and must include written answers to the following questions:
  • What is being satirized?
  • What satiric devices are used in the satire?
  • Is this Horatian or Juvenalian satire?  How do you know?
  • What is the creator's purpose in composing this satire? (Keep the audience in mind as you answer this.)
 2.28
Timed essay--USE STUDENT ID NUMBERS--(not about Othello, but an argument paper centered around a thematic concept--40  minutes to write)--100 points (This is your final argument paper until we do test prep--you got this!)

Reflection form 2.26 due

Self-evaluation; predicted score and rationale. Peer-evaluation and predicted scores.


You will need your books again starting March 2nd.

Shakespeare--serious or satire?
Read the following poem and decide if Shakespeare desires for this to be a serious love poem. LINK
 2.26 Othello journals 1-4 due

Argument review (1st 30 minutes)
--READ prior papers
--READ comments
--Reflection activity-complete in class (I will be checking these off as you complete them; you will use them to prepare for the in-class essay on 2.26, then submit them 2.26)

Critique the Critic
Discuss the article about Othello and domestic violence. What are the strengths and weaknesses of the argument? Do you agree/disagree? Are you convinced? Are there logical fallacies/holes in the reasoning? Do you have a counterargument? What is your position? What evidence would you use to support your position?

Film Version of Othello:
Watch 1st 9 minutes for setting and character introductions
Begin again at scene 23 until the end of the play. If you wish to view it at home in its entirety, you can rest this 1995 version on Amazon for $3.99 or purchase it for $9.99.

Review all notes on Argument prompts. Review self-reflection activity.

You will need paper and pens (blue and black) for class next time. Please also bring your generic argument scoring rubric.

 2.22
Homework prompts--discuss; write a thesis that QUALIFIES and list evidence for both sides (please complete this in pairs)
 Othello, Journal #4:
Read the following article: 
LINK and be prepared to discuss to what extent Othello is a play about domestic violence and abuse. This will NOT be your essay topic.


 2.20  Othello 
Act III, scene 4
Begin Act IV

Qualify: Which is more important: love or money?
Write a conditional thesis statement and list examples.

Consider  the following and be prepared to discuss in class next time.
Women are always victims because it is men who determine social organisation. Considers the ways in which the representation of men and women in Othello supports or challenges this assumption.

 2.9 Debate and Discuss:
What does it mean to be "honest"? When, if ever, is it acceptable/appropriate to lie?
 Work on journal entries.
 Feb. 1 Hand back essay rewrites and look at sample papers.

Multiple choice questions, answers, and discussion (Q. 1, 3, 5) for Tannen's "There is No Unmarked Woman."  

Theroux's "On Being a Man"
Possible Argument questions:
*  What claim does Theroux make about "being a man" in 1985?  Take a position on to what extent his claim remains true today.
*  Theroux writes, "There would be no point in saying any of this if it were not generally accepted that to be a man is somehow--even now in feminist-influenced America--a privilege? Take a position on the claim that to "be a man" implies to have privilege.
* After reading this piece, what do you see as the central issue facing boys and young men in our society? Identify this issues and argue at least one way to address this issue.

Start homework.

Registration stuff

Journal #6
Read Matthias R. Mehl's "Are Women Really More Talkative Than Men?" Focus on reading charts and graphs and understanding the purpose of footnotes. Short answers questions over footnotes:

1. Who wrote Language and the Woman's Place?
2. Which source was published by Morgan Road in New York?
3. Which source is an online document?.
4. Why are only pages 281-313 included in the citation for James and Drakich?
5. Who are the authors of Int. J. Corpus LInguist
6. What do the "2" and the "133" refer to in the Int. J. Corpus LInguist entry?
7. In footnote 7, why are the authors not listed in alphabetical order?
9. What is the purpose of footnote 8?
10. What is the purpose of footnote 9?


You may want your own copy of Othello (Folger edition if possible)
 1.30
Discuss Gould's "Women's Brains" assignment as a class for 30 minutes.
--questions for discussion 1
--journal questions RS #2, 4, 7, 9, 11
--components of a solid argument
--possible methods of organization
--addressing the opposition
--citing evidence/source information

Graded Discussion on Virginia Woolf (45 min):
Questions for Discussion 1, 4, 5, and 6. Questions on Rhetoric and Style #1, 2, 3, 5, 7, 8, 9, 11, 12.

Begin working on homework.
Start registration stuff-

Read and annotate Deborah Tannen's "There is No Unmarked Woman" (LC 552-557).

Read and annotate Paul Theroux's "Being a Man" (567-570)


 1.26  ESSAY REWRITE DUE TODAY!

Argument Practice--IN CLASS (COMPLETION GRADE ONLY)
Discuss Twain journal and Q/A
Take a Position on Twain's assertion that [i]t is our nature to conform" (para. 7).

Write a Thesis and Outline your argument--what claims will you make? What examples support your claims and your position? If you finish your outline, begin writing the paper.  You have only 30 minutes for this entire assignment.

Discuss Twain's essay, his view of "corn-pone" opinions and his view of conformity, possible approaches to this essay/thesis statements, and examples.

Begin homework: Arguments about sex and gender.
 Journal #5:
Gould homework reading and journal assignment. (LC 518-524) and in your journal answer Question for Discussion #1 AND Questions on Rhetoric and Style #2, 4, 7, 9, and 11

AND

Read Virginia Woolf's "Professions for Women" (LC p. 525-529). THINK ABOUT and be prepared to participate in a graded class discussion over the following. You do NOT have to answer these in your journal, but I would recommend taking notes or writing detailed annotations.
Questions for Discussion 1, 4, 5, and 6. Questions on Rhetoric and Style #1, 2, 3, 5, 7, 8, 9, 11, 12.

7 groups (D1 and 5, 4, 6, RS 1-2, 3 and 5, 7-9, and 11-12)

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