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AP Language & Composition

Date

In class work Homework
   WINTER BREAK

  Image result for snoopy christmas
OPTIONAL (but HIGHLY SUGGESTED for your mental health and well being!):
READ something you have always wanted to read!  No assignment over this, but you will have time to share when we return and we will create a "must read" reading list.
 12.21  Finals
Block 7: 8:00-9:30
Block 8: 9:40-11:10
 
 12.20 Finals
Block 4: 8:00-9:30
presentation of Visual Analysis 

David Sedaris selection from Santaland Diaries
Temp Link 

Block 5: 9:40-11:10
Block 6:  11:20-12:50 

Multiple Choice passages--2 passages (maybe entire test depending on time)
 
 12.19  Finals
Block 1: 8:00-9:30
Block 2: 9:40-11:10
Block 3:  11:20-12:50
presentation of Visual Analysis
 
 12.17  Visual analysis presentations--THIS WILL TAKE 2 DAYS; YOU WILL BE SIGNED UP FOR EITHER TODAY OR FINALS DAY.  
 12.13 Timed Essay--assessment
Final timed rhetorical analysis
--Please use student ID numbers on this instead of names
--Self evaluation and rationale

Work on visual analysis
 Work on visual analysis
 12.11  Timed Essay--practice
Please use student ID numbers on this instead of names
--self evaluation and rationale

work on visual analysis
Work on visual analysis
 12.7 Journals DUE
--discuss advertisement analysis before submission

Visual Analysis Presentation Assignment
Visual Analysis Presentation Rubric

Here is an site that may help you organize your information/presentation. It is listed as an "Outline" but this is not really outline format.

Here's a couple examples of full length essay (remember, yours will be a speech but the content and organization will be similar)

slideshare with text for analysis of Coke ad

blog with sample advertisement analysis

Here is a sample outline for a paper--your presentation outline may be similar


Work on visual analysis 
 12.5  Discuss journal and essays
--Group thesis statement Challenge
--submit your journal next time for your final journal grade for the semester. Your journal is worth 20 completion points. You should include the following journals:
Atlanta Exposition
Choice #1 (2 pages)
Choice #2 (2 pages)
Advertisement analysis

Hand back timed essays and discuss.
"Replacement" assignment--Roosevelt letter (LC p. 617-618--don't forget to read the background information)
Prompt: In a well written essay, analyze the rhetorical strategies Theodore Roosevelt uses to deliver his message about "the proper place for sports."

Visual Rhetoric:
What is Visual Rhetoric?
Rockwell artwork
Analyzing a painting/photograph
Analyzing a cartoon
Advertisement techniques handout
Analyzing an advertisement
Advertisement Assignment--you must have a printed, color ad for class today.



Finish advertisement journal questions--staple the advertisement in your journal.

Find 3-4 visuals that you think are interesting and worthy of analysis--these can be advertisements (NOT the same one you did for this assignment), paintings, magazine covers, posters, political cartoons, etc. Bring these to class next time.

Journals due next time.
 12.3 Essays--I have finished grading them, but I cannot return them as 3 people still need to make up the assignment. I will return them on Wednesday (grades are already in the grade book). At that time, I will discuss the essays and scoring. Students who did not earn a 5 or higher will have the opportunity to write a "replacement" essay--there are no rewrites at this point in the semester. Your grade will be replaced with a 70 IF you score higher on the replacement essay. 

LOC Selected readings--bring your book

discuss reading selections from homework
read, discuss. In PAIRS, write a prompt for this text. Explain the strategies and ideas you would expect to see in a well written rhetorical analysis essay on this prompt. This WILL BE SUBMITTED FOR A GRADE!

Begin working on your homework:




 Journal #

Select 1 of the following essays about sports to read, annotate, and write 2 pages of analysis in your journal
    Grantland Rice's "The Four Horsemen" (football) (LC 610-616); the analysis for this should address the use of metaphor and include a discussion of tone; you may certainly include other strategies/devices in your journal entry.
    Joyce Carol Oates's "The Cruelest Sport" (boxing) (LC 622-630); the analysis for this should address the use of literary allusions and a discussion of the paradox of boxing; you may certainly include other strategies/devices in your journal entry.
    Caroline Alexander's "The Great Game" (war and sports) (LC 660-995); the analysis for this should address her appeals to emotion (label the emotions) along with the connection she makes between sports and war; you may certainly include other strategies/devices in your journal entry.

AND, bring a color advertisement (or 2) to class next time!
 11.29
In-Class Essay--timed for 40 minutes

LOC Selected readings--bring your book

Journal #   :
Select 1 of the following to read, annotate it and write 2 pages of analysis in your journal; choose 1 or 2 significant rhetorical strategies to discuss in this analytical journal.

    David Foster Wallace's "This Is Water: Some Thoughts . . . " (LC 232)
    Eric Schlosser, from "In the Strawberry Fields" (LC 431)
    
Lars Eignher's "On Dumpster Diving" (p. 421-430)
 11.27 CONGRATULATIONS to Luke for winning the ESU Writing Competition.
CONGRATULATIONS to Honorable Mention winners Noah M. and Zach O.

Speeches and Letters

MLK due and discussion
--Four corners (Get up and moving!): Students will respond to statements posed by the teacher by moving to the corner of the room corresponding to their immediate reaction ( “strongly agree, agree, disagree, strongly disagree:).  Then discuss "What would MLK say/do?" and find textual evidence to support your claims.

1. "Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere"?
2. Citizens of a democratic country should generally obey laws, even those they disagree with.
3. It is easy or straightforward to determine which laws are unjust.
4. An appropriate response to an unjust law is to engage in nonviolent protest and demonstration.
5. An appropriate response to an unjust law is to engage in civil disobedience and intentionally break that law.
6. Those breaking an unjust law should accept the punishment given for breaking that law.
7. Prosecutors and juries have a responsibility to determine if the law they are given responsibility for enforcing is actually a just law. 

Submit written/typed assignment to Mrs. Webb for a grade!

Rhetorical analysis review packet--handout and discuss as a class.
Rhetorical analysis letters (former prompts) to annotate. Begin working on annotations; the rest of this is homework. Bring these 4 annotated prompts to class NEXT TIME!

 Homework prompts: Read all 4 speeches and annotate (that is all you need to do!)
   THANKSGIVING BREAK
Dancing Turkey
 
 11.16 Speeches and Letters
Share texts/tweets (many of you have not submitted this; you will received zeros)

Speeches and  Letters:
Adlai Stevenson letter
Coke letters
Dam letter (if we have time.)

Start MLK "Letter From Birmingham Jail" assignment in class.
ASSIGNMENT

*This is the homework I would have given you for a "normal" assignment during the week or over a weekend. I have NOT assigned additional work even though you have a week off; please enjoy your break.
**If you do not wish to take your textbook home or on vacation with you, MLK's "Letter from Birmingham Jail" can easily be found online.

 MLK "Letter from Birmingham Jail" reading and assignment.
ASSIGNMENT

*This is the homework I would have given you for a "normal" assignment during the week or over a weekend. I have NOT assigned additional work even though you have a week off; please enjoy your break.
**If you do not wish to take your textbook home or on vacation with you, MLK's "Letter from Birmingham Jail" can easily be found online.

 11.14 Count Pennies (15 minutes MAX)

Reminder for ESU contest essays.

Hand back scored Lincoln essay and discuss weaknesses.
Paragraph rewrite/revision: due FRIDAY for up to 5 points added to your essay score.

Abigail and John Adams Letters Assignment.
Read in LC on pages 535-538 or online using this link: Letters
Complete this assignment:
Abigail and John Adams Letters Assignment

Homework:
Read and annotate "Adlai Stevenson's Cat Bill Veto" (see me for a copy of this) to discuss next time.
Read and annotate the "Coke" letters to discuss next time.

Do Not Forget: CONTEST

EC essay for the ESU writing contest is due on (or before) November 15th end of day (11:59 PM) to me AND the address on the contest. Do not forget to include your picture and meet all assignment and submission requirements.
 11.12 Study of speeches:
Florence Kelly assignment due.
Complete the piece by including the sentences of analysis.
  • Examine college board sample papers 1-9 (I have all of them, I think)

In groups, evaluate and c/c the 4, 6, and 8 papers. What are the strengths and weaknesses of each? In your answers, give examples from each text (or explain what the text is missing). Write out thorough answers that demonstrate understanding and submit TODAY.
_____________________________________________________

After submitting the Kelley assignment,

Work on the letter assignment. Answers may be handwritten or typed, but all parts should be answered thoroughly to demonstrate understanding and submitted in class next time. 

Letters--Complete your own research and answer the following for submission NEXT TIME
1. What are the parts of a formal letter and how is a formal business letter formatted?
2.  What is an "open letter"? What does that mean in terms of audience and purpose? Where would an open letter be published and why would someone write one?
3. Why do we do close readings and analysis of letters in English and/or history/social studies? What types of letters may be examined? Written by whom?
4. What might I look for when I analyze a letter as text?

 Letters--Complete your own research and answer the following for submission NEXT TIME
1. What are the parts of a formal letter and how is a formal business letter formatted?
2.  What is an "open letter"? What does that mean in terms of audience and purpose? Where would an open letter be published and why would someone write one?
3. Why do we do close readings and analysis of letters in English and/or history/social studied? What types of letters may be examined? By whom?
4. What might I look for when I analyze a letter as text?

Do Not Forget: CONTEST
EC essay for the ESU writing contest is due on (or before) November 15th end of day (11:59 PM) to me AND the address on the contest. Do not forget to include your picture and meet all assignment and submission requirements.
 11.8 Tomorrow is end of 6 weeks

Study of speeches
--Class discussion over Booker T.
 Washington piece and complete multiple choice questions (30 min)

 Florence Kelly Prompt and complete the handout that accompanies the prompt.

 11.6 TIMED in-class rhetorical analysis; you have 60 minutes this time and may use ALL of your handouts.
This essay is worth ____ points.

Timed in-class essay--rhetorical analysis
10 minutes to read and annotate and plan
40 minutes to write
10 minutes to revise/edit/perfect

Samples and scoring. 
How do you think you did?  Predict score and justify.
 Journal #14
Read and ANNOTATE Booker T. Washington's "The Atlanta Exposition Address" (LC 417-420) and answer "Exploring the Text" #2, 3, 4, 7, and 10 AND find two additional strategies or items worthy of note and of analysis, then list them and explain why they are important (help achieve the purpose/impact the audience). Be prepared to participate in a class discussion over this next time. ALL students will be expected to participate.
Nov. 2  Hand back paragraphs and discuss sample papers for review--finish discussing Chief Red Jacket speech.

Discuss "Gettysburg Address" and Exploring the texts questions.

Green prompt:
--practice, samples, discuss
--review ethos, logos, pathos and how to write about them.
--scored, timed essay next time!
Review all writing notes
Review LC Chapters 1 and 2 
 10.31  HALLOWEEN

Discuss Chief Red Jacket reading and paragraphs
Revise one of your paragraphs after discussion; due at the end of the period today

If you finish early, begin working on Friday's homework.
DUE FRIDAY: Journal #13
Read Lincoln's "Gettysburg Address" (LC 1035) and answer Exploring the Text #2, 4, 5, 6, and 9 
 10.29 Finish any readings that we did not complete 10.25. 
(8 in each class)

Revisiting rhetoric
--handout and discussion
--group analysis activity (analysis of a Reagan's Challenger Speech or of Nerds)

Extra credit writing opportunity--must write AND submit; last year LHS students one 1st, 2nd, and 3rd place! $$$$


DUE WEDNESDAY (do NOT save this until Tuesday night/Wednesday late start)
Journal #12
Read the following and answer the questions in your journal 
Chief Red Jacket's "Defense of Native American Religion" (p. (LC 1097-1099) and answer the following questions in paragraph format (one FULL--8-11 sentences--paragraph per question) with examples and analysis.
1. How does Chief Red Jacket use syntax (sentence structure) to develop his position on Iroquois conversion to Christianity? (You MUST identify his position/purpose!)
2. How does Chief Red Jacket's use of language develop the tone of the passage? (You MUST identify the tone.)

 10.25  Oral reading of papers.  
 10.23  Under Construction
Transistions

Revisiting rhetorical analysis

Paper due--revision for oration
Share a reading of "The Monsters Under the Bed"

 Revise for an oral reading next time
 10.19 Syntax--parallel structure rules and practice (1st 30 minutes)

Rough draft due for workshop--see handout for check list and other instructions. 
COPY OF WORKSHOP PAPER

Work on revisions

 Revise for class next time.
 10.17 Rhetoric and writing:
Additional Classification samples.
"The Way We Walk" (student writer)
"The Plot Against People" (professional writer)
"Zombies" (student writer)
"Sports Fans" (student writer)



Organization of a classification paper--activity


Recursive Writing Process--Essay Writing
Please examine the assignment page for the classification essay.  You choose your own topic. If you need additional assistance, refer to the samples we read and discussed in class.


Link for the "Classification Essay Assignment"

--selecting topics (30 different topics, please)
--once your topic has been approved, start writing. Rough drafts due NEXT TIME.--I have 10 Chromebooks in class for student use as part of this process.
Work on your paper

Classification Topics--Period 3

Classification Topics--Period 4
 10.15  Discuss homework

Classification as a mode of writing:
  • What is "classification"?--slides
  • HOW and WHY would you use classification in a paper? 
  • WHAT is the relationship between definition and classification?
  • What types of "things" would you write about in a classification paper? Brainstorm some ideas as a class.

Classification Slides--take notes

Read "Facebook Friendonomics" (if we did not already do this) and discuss definition and classification as they overlap.
Read "The Most Annoying Facebookers"
Read "The People Next Door" (student essay)
Journal #11
Read and annotate "How to Detect Propaganda" (LC 756-761). (We will also review this when we read Chapter 3 and discuss argument.). In your journal, complete Discussion Question #2 on p. 761 for class next time.


10.10 Sentence Structure and punctuation:
Fixing RO sentences and combining sentence using commas and conjunctions.

 Definition
"Best in Class" and the definition of a "valedictorian." Discuss "Exploring the Text" 2, 3, and 4.

"Today's Kids are 'Like' Killing the English Language"--read and discuss

If time: "Facebook Friendonomics"

 Start working on homework




 

Start Brady and Theroux work in class. 
Begin working on homework. 
Read and annotate the following pieces in LC AND answer the questions in your journal:
  • Judy Brady's "I Want a Wife" (LC p.539-541); Q. #1, 5
  • Paul Theroux's "Being A Man" (LC p.560-570): Q #3
THEN, write a paragraph (8-10 sentences) that offers a brief 21st century definition of EITHER a "woman," a "man," or another gender designation. You paragraph should define the term and include examples and discussion of those examples.  Journal #10
 10.8 Gladwell paragraph due
                                                         
Definition
Rhetorical choices: Modes of Writing
Definition  Class Activity
Definition as a mode of writing:
  • How, when, and why might definition be USED in a paper?
  • Extended definitions and definition as a mode of writing.
  • When/why might you write a definition paper itself?
  • Why types of "things" would you write about in a definition paper?
  • Discuss Brady and Theroux's essays along with your own definition paragraph.
  • NPR article "A Not-So-Sweet Tax on Candy"
  • Sample definition in government documents "Candy"
If time, work on Dumas essay: Read and discuss "The F Word" (LC 738-741); focus on journals #1, 2, 8, 9 (p. 742).
Journal #9:

Read and ANNOTATE Margaret Talbot's "Best in Class" where she attempts to define what it means to be "valedictorian." (LC 223-232). In your journal answer "Exploring the Text" questions 2, 3, 4, and 8.


Journal #9:
Read and ANNOTATE Margaret Talbot's "Best in Class" where she attempts to define what it means to be "valedictorian." (LC 223-232). In your journal answer "Exploring the Text" questions 2, 3, 4, and 8.
 10.4  Discuss MC test briefly.

Hand back essays and discuss. Special focus on analysis.

Discuss pink packets and assess questions from Tuesday.

Hand back paragraphs you wrote last week. Read them. Highlight the ANALYSIS. How much of your paragraph is analysis? Is your analysis solid and convincing. What have you learned about analysis thus far and how can you improve yours. 

Discuss independent reading from your homework. What did you read? What did you think of the writing? What did you find that you can emulate?
Rewrite your Gladwell paragraph--focus is on analysis. 
Submit the revised paragraph with the original on Monday.

You will need your LC book for class next time.
 10.2  MC timed test--1 hr--just do your best; for diagnostic purposes only. Score and submit with NUMBER CORRECT to teacher.

Begin working on homework.


Homework: Journal #8
READ nonfiction. Find an piece of nonfiction writing--essay or lengthy article--something in which you are interested. (It can be a Sports Illustrated article even. The New Yorker and the Atlantic are good sources, or pick an author from the textbook and find something by that author that is not in the book.) Copy/print it.  Read and annotate it. Then, in your journal, complete the following steps:
1.  Write a summary--this needs to include key points
2.  Write a response/reflection on the article and how it was written (NOT the content, but the writing itself).  If you want to write something "meta" find an essay by a writer about writing and then complete the assignment.
3. Staple the copied essay/article in your journal. 


 9.28   "Okefenokee Swamp" assignment
1. Share your thesis with a partner; revise them to make them better.
2. Share your outline with a partner; revise it to add anything you left out.
3. Assignment handout--Read Sample H (you may NOT write on it or take it out of the room) and answer the "Assess" questions from the worksheet. This should be done QUIETLY AND INDIVIDUALLY--this is NOT a group assignment.
4. Submit your chart, thesis, outline, AND asses questions/answers over Sample H by the end of the period.

If you finish early, please read the multiple choice test handout and sample questions. You will have a full length mc test next time for practice. You should do your best, but it will NOT go into the grade book.
 Read multiple choice handout
 9.26 LC:  Gladwell's "Offensive Play:  How Different are Dogfighting and Football" (p. 643-657): questions 1-10 (NOT 2 or 10) 

Brain article and pictures

Questions were assigned to help you with today's writing activity.

Write and submit a thesis statement for this prompt:
Analyze the rhetorical strategies that Gladwell uses to convey his message.
(Think: Identify the message, determine HOW he relays the message).
Write a analytical paragraph to submit--it must have an arguable t.s., at least 2 examples, and clear analysis.

AFTER submitting your assignment, start working on the LC homework assignment.
Okefenokee Swamp (if you missed class, you can get a copy of this in class next time and will have to make  up part of the work)
1. Read and annotate prompt
2. Complete the chart attached to the prompt listing purpose, rhetorical choices, and affect on purpose
3. Look at your charts; write a compare/contrast thesis statement
4. Write an outline of an essay--you need only key points and examples, no analysis this time.

 9.24 Paper due--turnitin and hard copy

Notes on Compare/Contrast--including organization
Subject by subject (block format): 
Suzanne Britt's "Neat People vs. Sloppy People"
--read and discuss (Google this if you were not in class; you can find it online.
Point by point: Dave Barry's "Batting Clean Up and Striking Out"--read and discuss.

Work on Gladwell in class. Due next time.
 Journal #7
Gladwell's "Offensive Play" and questions 1-10 (you may only have 9 questions listed in the book--some editions have question 4 listed for two different question. Re-number these 1-10. THEN, complete them all EXCEPT #2 and #10.  Due 9.19
 9.20 1st 1/2 of class:

Timed RA

Journals 1-6 due TODAY at the BEGINNING of the period. I will grade them while you write your RA.
____________________________________________________

2nd 1/2 of class:

Voice Lessons.
Word Choice practice.
Sentence structure practice.


 Paper
 9.18 Discuss Mori essay & Compare/contrast
--review narrative techniques (dialogue and anecdotes), desciption, and example

Read Sherman Alexie's "Superman and Me" (did you read this last year?) (if you were absent, focus on questions 5, 7, and 10 when you read). Read and analyze "A Sentimental Education" together in class and discuss (If you were absent, focus on question 5--purpose and audience.)

Perspectives, argument, and debate: College education for prisoners--watch video(es?) and discuss with remaining time.

Review RA "stuff" for in-class essay next time.

Review Chapter 1: Rhetorical Triangle, SOAPSTones, glossary terms p. 36-38.
Review Chapter 2: 40-43, 46-47 especially pages 58-63, glossary terms p. 78-80.

In-class essay NEXT TIME!  You MUST bring paper and 2 blue/black pens. This will be a 40 minute timed writing. We will also be working on sentence structure, grammar, and word choice. You will NOT need your books, but you will want paper for this also.
 9.14 Homecoming Schedule & SPIRIT DAY--55 minute classes
Block 1--7:40-8:35
Block 2--8:45-9:40
Block 3--9:50-10:45
Block 4--10:55-11:50
Homecoming Assembly--12:00-1:00
Picnic--1:00-2:15
Bike Assembly--2:15-3:10

Finish Baldwin and Coates letters/compare and contrast
Discuss "An Talk to Teachers"
Baldwin video
Journal #6
Read Mori essay and in your journal answer "Exploring the Text #1, 2, 3, 4, 7, and 9

That's all--have fun at Homecoming.
 9.12  UNDER CONSTRUCTION

HOMECOMING DRESS UP--TOURIST DAY

Indian Education reading due--be prepared to answer questions.
--Re-read aloud in class
--assign questions at tables for presentation

Baldwin "Letter" selection due
Coates "Letter" selection due
Discuss and compare/contrast--finish charts as needed; you may do this in groups at your tables or move to other tables.

Discuss the letter as a mode of writing--what are some of the consistencies--what should we look for when analyzing letters.

Compare/contrast as mode of writing
Tomorrow is "Salad Dressing Day" 
Juniors:
Teachers:

Journal #5:
Read Baldwin "A Talk to Teacher" in textbook (p. 197-203) and answer the following questions: Exploring the questions (p. 203):
#4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10, and 12 due in class next time.


 9.10 HOMECOMING DRESS UP--JERSEY DAY

Hand back and briefly discuss writing sample, AP scoring, etc.  Hand out copy of AP scoring rubric

Dillard Due
--discuss ALL answers; it is important that you understand and are able to discuss and write about ALL of these items

DTR#3 DUE (stapled on top of #1 and #2--get 'er done this time ya'll)

Depending on time:
Voice Lessons?
Misplace modifiers?

UNIT on EDUCATION
Indian Education 

--read and work on assignment--due 9.12
Tomorrow is "America Day"

Finish Indian Education close reading and guiding questions. Be prepared to hold small groups discussion over these questions and/or present answers in class.

Read Baldwin letter 
Read Coates selection
SOAPSTones compare/contrast chart with Baldwin and Coates

Link to IE assignment--these are the questions we will discuss in class next time.
 9.6  DTR #2--hand back; required revisions due 9.10
Mini lessons over #6-10

Journal #4--"Brothers" letter and questions and answers. Journal check during discussion.

Syntax/Tone/Diction:
Voice Lessons
--reflexive structure
--parallelism
--juxtaposition

TERMS--These should be review. Please write down any with which you are unfamiliar and include examples as needed.

  • diction--the choice and use of words and and phrases in speech and writing
  • syntax--the way in which linguistic elements (such as words) are put together to form constituents (such as phrases or clauses or sentences)
  • style--a particular manner or technique by which something is done, created, or performed (in this case, style of writing)
  • rhetoric--the art of finding way (using language, in this case) to persuade
  • tone
  • imagery
  • irony
  • compare/contrast
  • parallelism--similarity of structure in a pair or series of related words, phrases, or clauses (may make up parallel sentences or a parallel paragraph)
  • juxtaposition--the act or an instance of placing two or more things side by side often to compare or contrast or to create an interesting effect

Dillard assignment--begin working on this. Due 9.10
Bring a copy to class for submission.

 DTR #3 due NEXT TIME

Dillard assignment due NEXT TIME (this may be time consuming--break it into smaller parts by doing some each day).

Dilllard--Assignement due 9.10
This may be typed or written in blue/black pen. This should be completed for submission.

Link to assignment (ignore pg. 5 and 6)
9.4 I still need writing samples from Emily and Zach.

Tone handouts for period 5 and absent students.

Submit DTR #2
--these will be returned to you on 9.6 for further revision as necessary.

First 1/2 of period:
Discuss Journal #3 and check annotations; discuss journal entries and moon articles/speech/cartoon.

Second 1/2 of period Notes on Modes of  Writing:

Narrative and descriptive writing.

Why words matter: Descriptive writing activity--sell this house. Prizes next time?


LoC and Journal #4:
Read and annotate p. 58-61; in your journal answer question 1-9 on p. 61--due next time.
   LABOR DAY WEEKEND  
 8.30 Hand back DTR--
#2 due NEXT TIME
Review titles (yours and the treatment of of others)
Review coordinating conjunctions and semi-colon and comma rules
Review "however" sentences

Discuss Chapter 1 reading and Journal 1:
For each text, how does the interaction of speaker, audience, and subject affect the text?
How does each text appeal to ethos, pathos, and logos?
How effective is each text in achieving its purpose? WHY?

Chapter 2:
Read pages 39-41; activity p. 41; then read 41-43
Tone handout--discuss
Read pages 43-44; activity p. 43; now LISTEN to Churchill's speech. Try to find it here:
https://winstonchurchill.org/resources/speeches/1940-the-finest-hour/blood-toil-tears-sweat/

Start homework if there is any remaining time.

DTR #2 due next time; please staple the newest version on top of the original attempt and submit BOTH next time.

 JOURNAL #3
Close reading Chapter 2--Please read all of the following pages and complete the assigned activities in your journal:
   Read pages 44-48 and complete the activity on p. 47.
   CAREFULLY Read pages 48-54 (you MUST actually read the annotations and the chart; you will select one of these two methods to annotate/take notes)
   Pages 56-58; Complete the activity on page 56 over Virginia Woolf's "Death of a Moth" (this is a difficult piece; you may need to read it 2x); you may annotate in your book if you own it and it has not already been annotated, you may take notes on your own paper with a graphic organizer, or you may print a copy of the text and annotate that. You must also answer the questions in the Activity box on p. 56 (you do NOT need to complete a thesis or an outline).
This is due at the beginning of class after Labor Day weekend (5 days to complete the assignment; don't save it for Monday night--you won't finish); I WILL be checking your annotations/notes and your answers to the questions.

Students: you may find a printable copy of "Death of a Moth" here if you do not have your own textbook.
 8.28  DTR DUE

Discuss summer assignment and scoring.

In-class timed writing sample

LOC discuss Chapter 1 (we will circle back to this chapter ALL year, so make sure you know and understand ALL of the material presented): review ethos, logos and pathos--and how to write about them; effective and ineffective rhetoric.

Read and discuss "Rhetorical Analysis of Visual Texts" section (p. 21-23); analyze WWF ad (p. 23), PETA ad (p. 25), and FHA ad (p. 29).

Point out terms.

Start homework if there is remaining time.
LOC--Chapter 1 and Journal 2
Read and carefully annotate (or take notes)  pages 30-35
For EACH (there are 4) text, complete a SOAPSTone in your journal. We will be discussing these in class and using them for another activity.  DUE NEXT TIME!

 8.24  Rhetorical triangle, close reading, and annotations
LOC Chapter 1
  9/11 speech and practice annotations
  read chapter

Rhetorical strategies in you might annotate in the "9/11" speech:
*Definitions and examples can be found in the Rhetorical Terms dictionaries in my classroom; many are also in the glossary of your text at the end of Chap 1, 2 and 3.
  • alliteration
  • pronoun usage, 
  • language choices (i.e.: conflict vs. war) and connotations/denotations,
  • intentional fragments, 
  • parallel structure,
  • tri-colon, 
  • imagery, 
  • repetition,
  • balanced sentences and antithesis.
  • organization of past, present, future (most speeches and sermons are organize this way

  Work on DTR--This assignment is due on August 28

LOC--finish reading chapter 1 and complete the activity on p. 20-21 (read to the end of page. 28--we will work with this in class next time.)

GOALS for Study of Rhetoric:
  • Understand and be able to explain "rhetoric."  The power of language:  What is ONE word that describes YOU.
  • List the possible elements that may make up "context."
  • Draw and label the rhetorical triangle for a given reading assignment.
  • Know what SOAPSTones stands for and complete SOAPSTones as a beginning step toward full rhetorical analysis of a given reading assignment.

 8.22  Summer reading group activity and presentation; submit  this to Mrs. Webb today.

DTR assignment.  Use the links in the next column to access the grammar and punctuation packet and the assignment (if you misplace your copy). Begin working on this in class today.
 Work on DTR--This assignment is due on August 28
(You will have an additional assignment next time, so do NOT procrastinate as this assignment could be time consuming.)

Assignment
DTR Guidelines/Packet  (you NEED this to complete the assignment!)
 8.20  Introductions--bucket list

Course Overview, Guidelines and Expectations

Check out books for students who did not purchase the text

Safety and security

Small group discussions of summer reading
--bring your book and your summer assignment
--In small groups, SHARE your quotes and notes
--as group, decide which passage is most significant and why?
--share out to class

SOAPSTone(s) handout with questions.  KEEP THIS ALL YEAR!
Review your summer reading. Think about SOAPSTones for one or more of the passages you annotated and/or the book as a whole.  Bring all of this to class next time for an in-class activity with SOAPSTones and to submit. (If you read the Coates' book, you should choose between the following: top pf p. 14 to middle of p. 17, middle of p. 64-middle of p. 69, top of p. 75-bottom of p. 79, or pages 111-114)
 8.17 1st day meet & greet 
Course Overview--who plans to check out a book?
TURNITIN information
Name & what makes you unique or anything else you want to share
 Bring your summer text and notes to class NEXT TIME!

Submit yor summer assignment to Turnitin.com BEFORE class next time!

 TURNITIN:

Course number: 18683197
Enrollment Key: APLang



   WELCOME BACK!
   EVERYTHING BELOW THIS LINE IS FROM LAST YEAR AND IS FOR TEACHER PLANNING PURPOSES. PLEASE DO NOT DO THESE ASSIGNMENTS AT THIS TIME--THEY MAY CHANGE.  
 12.14

Work on 6 word memoirs

 6 word memoir
 12.12 Language Acquisition Cartoon
discuss and analyze
SOAPStone(s) for a visual

LOC Selected readings--bring your book
David Sedaris's "Me Talk Pretty One Day" (218-222); read and annotate; discuss "Exploring the Text" questions 1, 2, 5, 6, 8.

6 word memoir--Work on this the rest of the period. Oral presentations and visual for your final.
6 word memoir
 12.8 LOC Selected readings--bring your book
--discuss reading selections from homework
--Write a prompt over the passage you read.

 Last child in the woods--Finish analysis boxes (3 boxes for 3 examples) in groups; write 3 multiple choice questions as a group.

Introduce 6 word memoir visual and presentation for FINAL.
Please read the following assignment and get started on it for homework. Presentation of this will be your FINAL.

6 Word Memoir Assignment (Google Doc)


6 Word Memoir Samples (Google Doc)
     
 11.28
MC rationale assignment--due Monday, December 4
Even though you have been given the correct answers, this is actually a time consuming task and more difficult than you think. Select questions that you struggled with and do the following for EACH.
 

Write the question stem (the ENTIRE question without the answers)
Explain WHICH answer is correct and WHY it is correct
Explain WHY EACH of the incorrect answers is incorrect (you may have to examine relationships, look up words, etc.)

SAMPLE:
Multiple Choice Sample Rationale

Question 2:  Which of the following best represent the author's intended audience?
A--YES. The audience would be well acquainted with Carlyle's writing. This is obvious in lines 47 and 55 when his works are listed but not summarized (nor are examples from the works included). It is assumed that the audience is familiar with these works and will agree with the the effects that the author is describing.
B--No. No examples are given or analyzed. No summary of the prose is provided.
C--No. This passage is about the effects of Carlyle's prose, there is no discussion of HOW to write like Carlyle or discussion of other authors in general.
D--No. Methods for teaching Carlyle are not addressed.
E--No, it is about the influence of his writing. There are not examples from his personal life.

How many do I get to do!?
You MUST complete this correctly for 6 questions to earn a C on the assignment (30/40 points)
You MUST complete the correctly for 7 questions to earn a B on the assignment (35/40 points)
You MUST complete this correctly for 8 questions to earn an A on the assignment (40/40 points)

 11.15
Finish visual rhetoric/analysis from Monday.

Thanksgiving reading assignments, visual assignments, listening assignments.

What is "Thanksgiving"?
Definition--words and/or pictures
Analysis of Thanksgiving cartoons
Rockwell painting p. 356-357 (color pic. after page 604). Compare and contrast with 
Roz Chast's "The Last Thanksgiving" (LC 358-359)
Sarah Vowell's "Turkeys in Pilgrim Clothing" (10 minutes)

 
 11.13 Start visual analysis (we may not get to all of this):
LC p. 21-23, 29 (color pictures after p. 604)
Visual analysis questions and in-class activity.
Rockwell painting and worksheet
Photo analysis

     
 9.29  End of 1st 6 weeks. 

YOU NEED YOUR LC BOOK TODAY!

Mini lesson on punctuation:
--correctly using commas and semi-colons
--lesson handout: click here
--worksheet: click here


 


 AP English periods 3 and 4
Monday--bring your eclipse glasses and we'll try to sneak out of class and take a peek.

 
 AP English periods 3 and 4
Monday--bring your eclipse glasses and we'll try to sneak out of class and take a peek.

 
GOALS for Study of Rhetoric:
  • Understand and be able to explain "rhetoric."  The power of language:  What is ONE word that describes YOU.
  • List the possible elements that may make up "context."
  • Draw and label the rhetorical triangle for a given reading assignment.
  • Know what SOAPSTones stands for and complete SOAPSTones as a beginning step toward full rhetorical analysis of a given reading assignment.
GOALS for Study of Rhetoric:
  • Understand and be able to explain "rhetoric."  The power of language:  What is ONE word that describes YOU.
  • List the possible elements that may make up "context."
  • Draw and label the rhetorical triangle for a given reading assignment.
  • Know what SOAPSTones stands for and complete SOAPSTones as a beginning step toward full rhetorical analysis of a given reading assignment.

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